Home > SD 2014 Ballot, South Dakota > Gordon Howie releases his first US Senate commercial

Gordon Howie releases his first US Senate commercial

July 17, 2014

Today Independent US Senate candidate Gordon Howie released a commercial for his US Senate bid in South Dakota. I was hoping for something.. well.. different for his first commercial. Here is the commercial released today:

I was hoping Howie wouldn’t go down the path he chose with this commercial. As an Independent candidate I was hoping Howie would look at the many issues that exist within the federal government he is willing to tackle. With his tea party roots I really thought he could find a way to speak about getting government out of peoples lives. No. Instead he went the opposite direction.

Howie is asking for religion and politics to become more intertwined. He actually says “Politicians need to put God back in politics”. He then goes on to say pastors should endorse candidates from the pulpit. Gordon is headed down the path I feared he would in this race.

Before going on I’ll clear up my stance on religion and politics. To me the two do not inter-mingle well at all. It is OK and appropriate for people to live their lives by religion, and even serve as a politician using their religious convictions. But living life through religious convictions is much different from legislating through religion. I fear that is where Howie would go if elected into office.

Howie mentions in the video that he believes there is a an attack on religious values and God during the last few years. I would say that is somewhat exaggerated. But there is some truth to what he says. Yet it is not the fault of any anti-religion group. Rather it is the fault of politicians that have legislated religious beliefs over the years.

A good example of this is the reversal of DOMA’s ban on gay marriages. Many conservatives hailed this as an attack upon religion. Well, looking at their point of view I can agree it may appear that way. But I prefer looking at the bigger picture. DOMA only existed because the social conservatives allowed the government to get involved with and regulate marriages. If conservatives were truly worried about religious freedom they would have kept government out of marriage altogether. That is not what happened.

The DOMA reversal shows why politicians should avoid creating or voting for legislation that reinforces their religious beliefs. It may make them feel good and make them popular at the moment with their constituency. Yet in the future when popular opinion has changed on a subject it will allow that legislation to be changed in a way that would be undesirable to those same constituents. At that point those constituents cannot rightly claim their religious beliefs are being attacked. By passing the original religiously intrusive legislation, that group had asked for government to be involved with an issue that is better left to religious leaders.

If enough Gordon Howies are elected in DC I feel liberty would go down as religious legislation goes up. Too bad Howie isn’t focusing more on the Taxed Enough Already part of his Tea Party roots. Instead Howie is pushing for breaking down any barriers between government and religion. That is a situation I just don’t see being good for liberty.

PS. Since I’ve done a couple of posts that are negative towards Howie’s positions I’ve had a some people ask if I’ve turning into an anti-Howie blog. Nope. I think its great he is in the race to give another option to voters. But supporting him being in the race is NOT the same thing as supporting him as a candidate. I plan to do posts on any Independent or third-party candidates whenever I can.  To me the biggest injustice that happens to independent and third-party candidates is the lack of attention they get from most mainstream media outlets.

  1. Merlyn Schutterle
    July 17, 2014 at 7:07 pm

    Thank God we don’t have to worry abut Howie getting elected.

  2. July 17, 2014 at 8:43 pm

    Ken Santema wrote:
    >”The DOMA reversal shows why politicians should avoid creating or voting for legislation that reinforces their religious beliefs. It may make them feel good and make them popular at the moment with their constituency. Yet in the future when popular opinion has changed on a subject it will allow that legislation to be changed in a way that would be undesirable to those same constituents. At that point those constituents cannot rightly claim their religious beliefs are being attacked. By passing the original religiously intrusive legislation, that group had asked for government to be involved with an issue that is better left to religious leaders.”

    Well said, Ken. Those who share my belief that the Bible is true ought to be wary of the “war on drugs” and the “war on terror” for similar reasons. Government with more power to take away other people’s freedom is government with more power to take away ours. Jesus actually warned about this in one of the Matthew 13 parables: “While you’re gathering up the tares [bad people], you may uproot the wheat [good people] with them. Allow both to grow together until the harvest” (verses 29-30).

    In Gordon’s defense, the framers of the Constitution generally regarded God as the Source of our unalienable right to liberty rather than its enemy.

    • July 18, 2014 at 3:14 pm

      I agree with your defense of Gordon. That is the main reason I don’t invoke the founding fathers too often. The founding fathers have been mischaracterized by people of all political leanings.

      • July 18, 2014 at 4:31 pm

        Indeed they have. Thanks, Ken.

  3. Merlyn Schutterle
    July 18, 2014 at 7:29 am

    And science is under attack by the religious fruitcakes. If I have to choose between scientists like Einstein, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Bill Nye and Steven Hawkings with honest investigation behind them or religious people like Pat Robertson, Jessie Jackson, Al Sharpton, Jerry Fallwell and the rest of the fruitcakes with nothing but emotion behind them, the choice is easy for me.

    • July 18, 2014 at 4:29 pm

      We may be a little off topic here, Merlyn, but I think the widespread perception that science and religion can’t be reconciled is largely a result of the fact that major media outlets like CNN routinely conceal scientific evidence that supports the Bible. Read this to learn more:
      http://www.jasonlisle.com/2012/10/25/the-rest-of-the-story/

      • Merlyn Schutterle
        July 18, 2014 at 11:24 pm

        With due respect, Kurt, when I apply critical thinking and investigation skills to the three major books on religion, the Koran, the Bible and the Book of Mormon, I find the writings themselves disprove the books. There is lots of really crazy stuff in them. There is so much conflicting stuff in them it is easy to see they are not the word or work of God. The “creator” made the laws of physics and I don’t believe it would violate its own laws.

        If you have a good understanding of psychology, it is easy to understand how and why these books were written by men.

      • Merlyn Schutterle
        July 18, 2014 at 11:27 pm

        Therefore, I don’t want Howie running things from what is written in the his Bible.So we really aren’t off topic, Kurt,

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